The Anne of All Trades Blog

Minimizing Dust and Maximizing Filter Life

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

I have had an older model of this same Ridgid vacuum in my shop since the beginning. They were hardy, affordable, and had a lifetime guarantee. For a broke wanna be woodworker trying to build up my shop, that’s all I could ask for in a tool. I’ve still got that vacuum and it’s kept my shop clean and played dust collector like a champion for 7 years, and I couldn’t ask any more of a tool.

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So when it came time to test the Ridgid 16 Gallon 6.5 HP vacuum for this review, I was pretty well versed with what I’d be getting, a great tool for a great value. This thing boasts the best CFM in it’s class. The new nozzle clips keep the hose and attachments from detaching unexpectedly, which is a brilliant answer to one of my biggest frustrations when cleaning the shop. At 16 gallons, this is still technically a “portable” tool, but if I was regularly moving it around the jobsite, and not just pulling it around my smooth concrete shop floor, I might be inclined to get a smaller model.

As is the case with most shop vacuums, this model has a blower, but I never use the blower (on purpose at least, there was one unfortunate incident where I had the hoses hooked up wrong and accidentally blew dust all over the shop I’d just spent two hours meticulously cleaning… we will just attribute that incident to an extreme lack of sleep).

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The one thing I don’t love about this tool is it’s cloth storage pouch. It does hold all the attachments, but I think it looks kind of sloppy and, it being cloth, it collects dirt and dust just like you might expect a cloth bag on top of a dust and trash receptacle would. Another feature I would really, really like on a shop vacuum would be an automatic cord reel. The wrap provided works, but isn’t my favorite design. Another thing I would really love to see less of on this tool is plastic. That said, I also understand the manufacturing process, and alternative construction materials would increase the cost of the unit significantly. 

This vacuum retails for $159. Would I buy it?

Absolutely, I have been using a similar Ridgid vac in my shop for 7 years.

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What about the Dustopper attachment?

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Retailing for $40, the Dustopper is Home Depot’s answer to the Dust Deputy, which retails for $50. I have both, and both are good products. I wouldn’t use either on my every day vacuum that I drag around the shop while I clean because they are cumbersome and the Dustopper bucket tends to tip over a lot, but on a stationary tool hooked up to the vacuum, they are MAJOR filter savers. When the Dustopper is attached, the majority of the dust and debris  falls directly into the 5 gallon bucket beneath it, and very little material goes into the vacuum. I use it most on my chopsaw and oscillating spindle sander because those fine particulates are enemy No. 1 of my vacuum filters. Without an auxillary product, all that fine dust clogs the filter and the vacuum loses CFM really quickly. The thing I like most about the dustopper is it’s low profile. It fits under my chop saw like a glove. I actually bought the dust deputy to live under that cabinet, but it didn’t fit, so I was really glad to find another option that worked.

Posted on October 26, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Reviewing the Bosch BLAZE 165' Laser Tape

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

I am a huge fan of this tool’s little brother, the GLM 42 135 ft Laser Measure, and I reviewed it in July (click here to read it).  This model, the GLM 50, costs an extra $20, retailing for $119. It offers an additional 30’ of accurate measurements (165’ digital tape) and Bluetooth capability so you can use the tool in conjunction with your cell phone on the Bosch Measure app, giving you greater storage capacity and versatility using this tool. Those are the only two differences between this tool and the GLM 42, so this review will be pretty short, as I’ve sung the GLM 42’s praises quite loudly here before.

Probably the coolest feature that comes with the Bluetooth capabilities of this tool is the ability to overlay your digital measurements onto photos.  For a visual person like myself, that is a really awesome concept. That said though, I’m not super tech savvy and the app is a tad cumbersome to use. I really like the GLM 42, and if it were up to me I’d just buy a GLM 42 and save my extra $20.

If you’re keen on gadgets and cool features though, and are patient enough to learn and work with the app, the cool factor on this tool is extremely high. The GLM app allows you to create floor plans from within the app. You can do real-time measurements, tack those to photos of the space, and you get an increased storage capacity by integrating with the app. The tool will calculate length, area, volume, and can measure/calculate angles and perform addition and subtraction calculations.

Posted on October 25, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Finally, a Fantastic Battery Powered Router!

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

Ever since I first used this tool in a Makita booth at a show last year, I knew I had to have it. I actually really don’t use routers very often in my woodshop, something that I didn’t think was weird until I started hanging out with other woodworkers who do. I’ve always been annoyed by their high pitched squeal and the huge mess they make. But the release of a battery powered tool I can use outside? Game changer. First of all, I’ve had the majority of my tools on the Makita platform for most of the past seven years. While I have recently been wooed by some of the new releases from Milwaukee, Makita has been making tools that are a solid investment for far longer than I’ve been using tools.

This cordless router is no exception. It is compact and lightweight. The blade housing/fence mechanism is easy to adjust and remove for quick blade changes. It’s not going to have the same battery life as, say, a drill, even the 4ah batteries, but that is not really a surprise, especially considering what kind of power it takes to actually cut wood. The saving grace is the fact that this tool runs on brushless motor, which is electrically controlled from within to meet changing demands with regard to torque and speed. Run time will depend on the type of wood, the type of bit, and the depth of cut. Makita’s new batteries also have juice gauges on the actual battery, so you can monitor your battery useage easily. A quick aside on the batteries- that life-indicator is amazing. I can’t even tell you how many times I’ve carried a handful of batteries out to the jobsite only to stick them in my tool and realize they were dead. It’s a long, frustrating walk back from the forest or the pasture when I do that, so I really, really dig the new indicator feature.

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There are only a couple buttons on this tool. There’s a dial to control the speed and a lock/unlock safety switch to turn it on. It has been a little tricky getting used to the button placement, especially since they are so small, but I’m sure that will come in time.

If there was one design feature I would love, it would be to have a spot on the tool that the wrenches could tuck into. On my corded routers, I always attach the wrenches to the end of the cord and then I never lose them. On a cordless router, no such luck.

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This tool retails for $130. Would I buy it?

Though a few other companies have made cordless routers, Makita was the first company making tools for the professional to come out with a true knockout tool. At $130, I’d say it’s a reasonably priced router, and I would definitely buy it. That said, if you were new to the Makita platform, the addition of the battery and charger at $149 would make this a much tougher pill to swallow- I might actually think twice about dragging out the extension cords and waiting for a brushless, cordless tool on your battery platform.

Batteries always seem to be the major killer when it comes to tool pricing, which is the main argument for picking one tool company and sticking with it. Not to mention, it’s a pain juggling 10 different chargers and their cords. I don’t take it lightly that this tool testing gig affords me the opportunity to use so many different tools and brand platforms, because it’s taught me so much about how tools actually work and it’s taught me to become a far more discerning customer. It also allows me to really use and abuse the tools and pick my favorites. I can only hope that that translates well into honest, helpful reviews for readers. This Makita router is definitely one of my favorite tools I’ve used this year. The fact that Makita has such a diverse product line is also a big argument to love the company- their battery operated chainsaw and lightweight circular saw get used on the daily around the farm.

 

Posted on October 25, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Testing the Dremel Multi-Max

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

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Ok, let’s talk about this oscillating tool and it’s attachments. I tested the Multi-Max itself, $129, the Universal Oscillating Tool Accessory kit for Wood, Metal and Drywall, $29.97 and the Cutting and Variety Accessory kit for Wood, Metal and Drywall, $29.97.

Dremel really knocked this one out of the park- the only thing that could have made this tool better (for me at least) would be adding battery power. Having used the corded Milwaukee, Dewalt, and Fein iterations of this tool extensively, the Dremel really takes the cake. Here are my favorite points:

 -There is significantly less vibration of the tool when in use.

-Lighting fast blade changes with no extra tools.

-The locking mechanism on the head of the tool is easy to use and doesn’t accidentally come loose, a huge plus with the safety conscious.

-The kit comes with pretty much everything you’d  need for the first few projects you’d tackle with the tool.

-The fact that you can reposition the blade at an angle to get into tight spots is also a major bonus.

-The tool is lightweight, comfortable to hold and to use, the ergonomics are solid.

-The blades cut quickly and really seem to last well

-Competitively Priced

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While this tool is a breeze to use, there are a few things only longterm use will prove- I wonder how the blade locking mechanism I like so much will handle getting gunked up from prolonged use around the jobsite (read, what happens when the donkeys kick a whole pile of woodchips and manure on it while they casually walk by?) My other main concern is with the accessories for the tool. While the tool itself is fairly affordable, the Dremel branded attachments are somewhat less budget friendly, but they are also performing better than some of the competitors’ attachments, so it may all be a wash. As it is, I just so happened to be doing a ton of renovation and construction projects this quarter, so this tool saw some heavy use in my metal shop project as well as the chicken coop project. It got dirty it got slightly abused, and it’s performed incredibly well despite it all. It’s quieter, vibrates less than the two other tools I’ve been using the last few years and blade changes are a breeze- this tool is a real win for Dremel.

Posted on October 23, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Fancy Fencing with Ryobi

Reviewing the Ryobi One 18V Shears

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

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 I’ve been singing Makita’s praises for providing so many helpful farm implements on their battery powered platforms for years. Ryobi has provided me with two GAME CHANGER tools on their battery platform this year- first, with the 40v Weed Whacker (don’t even get me STARTED on the frustrations of dealing with small engines around the farm in the Seattle rain), now with these shears.  When stringing fence, these things were the handiest tool I’ve come across in a WHILE. We use 2”x4” galvanized  livestock wire all over the farm. These Ryobi shears whiz right through the stuff. I used to snip every single wire individually, which is extremely time consuming and makes for a major hand-ache. This tool has single-handedly cut fencing time and frustration in half.

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These shears are also geared well toward cutting sheet metal, but I’ll be honest, figuring out the proper jaw angle and width for the tool to work properly is a bit tough. If cutting sheet metal was my main goal, I’d be inclined to look at other options.

This tool retails for $79. Would I buy it?

This tool is yet another instance of the battery costing more than the tool itself, but, especially for those caring for any amount of property, between the weed whacker and these shears, these tools have more than proved their value around the farm and I’d recommend both highly.

The 18V 6 AH Battery on the Ryobi platform really packs a punch. I use it in my weedwhacker and get an amazing life out of it. The power indicator on the front of the battery is great because I can always check and make sure I’ve got juice before carrying it out to the jobsite. As is the case with every battery platform though, it’s pricey, so make sure you’ve got enough tools you’re running on it to make sure you get your money’s worth.

To see this tool in action, check out my YouTube video on building the Chicken coop:

Posted on October 22, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Getting Organized with DeWalt

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

This won’t likely come as a surprise to many in my audience, but I’m a bit of a hoarder. I’m sure I’ve always had it in me, but something about living on the farm has really brought it out. The longer I spend living on a farm, the better I’ve gotten at thinking quickly on my feet and solving problems on the fly. When so many things can be fixed with haybale twine, scrap wood and pipes I just find laying around, it’s no surprise it’s getting increasingly difficult to part with anything that is more obviously useful like boxes of nails and screws, of which I’ve amassed quite the collection.

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These Dewalt small parts organizers came at just the right time. Doing so many construction projects around the farm this summer; working on the tiny house, the chicken coop, and the metal shop, I was always running back to the house for this or that. I was able to dump a huge collection of assorted boxes of stuff which were formerly clogging the entire surface of my workbench into the organizers in a very (you guessed it) organized fashion. I created an “outdoor construction” box with deck screws, metal roofing screws, fence staples, and other assorted items which I can easily pack to the worksite all together and save myself a few extra trips back to the shop.

 In the large organizer, the cups come out individually, so you can grab whatever you need and shut the box to prevent accidental spills and moisture. The small parts organizer has moveable partitions which allow the user to create custom sized compartments.

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When all is said and done, the organizers can be clipped together and tossed out of the way. The clear tops make for easy location of different parts. These also incorporate seamlessly with Dewalt’s pack-out system, but these are pretty useful to me as an independent unit.

 These organizers retail for $30: Would I buy them?

 Absolutely. I love that they are stackable, giving endless opportunity for more organization. At this pricepoint, they are sturdy, versatile, and they got a load of crud off my workbench.

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Posted on October 21, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

The 3100 finally has a name!

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In June, I had the incredible opportunity to buy my dream farm truck, a 1953 Chevy 3100. My grandpa and I had always planned to restore an old truck together, but he passed away before we got the chance. When I graduated from University, I restored a 63 mustang in his honor, but I had to sell it while I was living in Asia.

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This truck seemed too good to be true, and for a couple of months, it was. As it turns out, when I went to register the truck, there was a title issue which prevented me from transferring the title into my name. I’d done my due diligence, from as far as a lay-person could tell, everything was in order with my purchase, but when I went to register it, all kinds of red flags started going up. To make a very long story short, I’m now on a first name basis with everyone at our local and state DMVs and there have been endless visits to their offices, endless paperwork, and lots of phone calls. The whole situation has been very frustrating in and of itself, but most frustrating is the fact that I can’t start any of the major renovation projects on the truck until the title is clear. That said, it being an old truck, it does need a little fiddling here and there to keep it running in the meantime, and of course I’m happy to oblige.

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Earlier this week, my little buddy, Chairman Meow, who’s been shop and farm cat extraordinaire for seven years, the cat who followed me like a dog, slept at the foot of my workbench in the shop, and ran to greet me when I pulled into the driveway, passed away suddenly. Chairman was my first pet stateside, a gift to Adam and I while we were engaged, and to say we were very attached is an understatement. He was a constant in our young marriage, he made the move to the farm with us like a champion, and he lived the best life a cat could live, and none of that made it easy to say goodbye to him.

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A few minutes after I got the news about Chairman, however, I got the call that the truck was finally mine. I decided to name the truck the Chairman in my little buddy’s memory- a reminder that even on the hardest days there is a silver lining to look for.

Posted on October 8, 2018 and filed under Adventures and Updates, Blog.

Husky LED Lights Review

This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

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My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

Ok let’s talk lights: The Husky 200 Lumen LED Magnetic Clip Light $9.97, The 200 Lumen LED Magnetic Hook Light $9.97 (I like to call it a puck light), and the Husky 300 Lumen LED Dual Beam Aluminum Headlight $14.97.

I’ll be honest, at first glance, I made a snap judgment that these lights were just going to be another thing knocking around in the bottom of a drawer somewhere, but I tossed them in my work bag to put them to the test and was shocked at just how often they’ve come in handy. As I’ve mentioned many times, I spend a lot of time working around the farm where there are no power cords. I also have a bad habit of working really late at night, so extra light is usually a huge plus. I have and love the 18v Milwaukee work light, but it doesn’t fit in my work bag and can’t sneak into tight spots for directional lighting.

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It’s important to remember that, especially with tools, you get what you pay for, and Husky definitely does appeal far more to the homeowner and the contractor looking for a good deal than to those making lifetime tool investments, but I really appreciate that Husky backs up their brand with solid warranty and replacement plans. While Husky tools had a noticeable dip in quality several years ago, the brand has made a lot of strides over the past two years to really kick up their product lines and production standards, so if you haven’t used any of their recent tools, I think they are definitely worth a second look.

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These little Husky lights are compact, bright, and have a decent battery life considering the amount of light they are putting out. The magnetic puck clicks onto car hoods, hangs on nails, and provides great directional lighting in tight spaces. The magnetic clip light has a little pull-out stand, and can be set on the floor and angled directly at the area you need to light up. Though I hate wearing headlamps, it’s often the only option when climbing around in rafters, something I’ve been spending quite a bit of time doing lately. The headlamp is comfortable, has four modes- spot, flood, both, and a flashing red light. The incorporation of the reflective backing on the battery pack expands the useability of this light outside the jobsite to biking, hiking, or camping. The lights all have rubber casing, with the intention of giving added protection for drops. The clip lights have Phillips head screws on the battery pack, and while I hate having to grab another tool to change batteries, it is nice that when the lights do get dropped or knocked over, the batteries don’t go flying in ten different directions.

Since I’m planning on keeping these little lights in my work bag, always at the ready, I went ahead and invested in some rechargeable batteries. The lights come with batteries to get you started, but they only had about a three hour run-time on those batteries. I just feel better knowing I’m not running through and disposing of a whole lot of batteries over the life of these tools.

Would I buy these tools?

These three lights have earned a long-term spot in my tool bag, because they shed much needed light in tight spaces and have a small footprint in my toolbag. For under $35, it’s a small investment with big rewards.

That magnetic puck light especially, for $10 is pure awesome. I’ve used it all over the farm, working on my old farm truck, and it now lives on the fridge in my metal shop, ready to grab whenever needed.

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Posted on October 8, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Husky 9 Drawer Workbench Review

This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

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My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional mechanic. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and home renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

So let’s talk about this Husky 9 Drawer Workbench:

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Organization has always been a huge struggle for me. Part of my creative process involves a major explosion of all the tools and supplies I own. Logically speaking, I know that cleanliness and organization are the keys to productivity and efficiency, but somehow, despite my best intentions, I’m a tornado in my own space. One way to stave of the hurricane, however, is to make sure everything has it’s place.

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This bench is a real winner. It looks sleek, it’s got a solid base, and it provides an enormous amount of storage, which, for me at least, was a huge step in the right direction.

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Awesome features:

·      Strong drawers

·      Drawers extend fully, and offer full support even when fully extended

·      Bottom drawers offer tons of storage

·      The built in power strip is awesome

·      The handle on the side makes for easy relocation even when fully loaded

·      Comes with grip mats which protect tools and keep them from slipping around

·      The paint holds up well and the welds and fasteners are all solid

Things I wish were better/different:

·      I wish the wheels were made of rubber rather, would be more durable and have better non-slip capabilities

·      The benchtop doesn’t seem super durable. It’s replaceable, but I don’t want to have to replace it. It’s easily damaged by solvents and dents/scratches easily

This bench retails for $309. Would I buy it?

If you’ve got stacks of tools and supplies clogging up your workspace, you owe it to yourself to get organized. If adding more drawer space and another work surface can help you get there, you’d be hard pressed to find a better bench at this price point.

Posted on October 4, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Milwaukee 18V Brushless Drill/Driver Set

This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

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My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

So let’s talk about this month’s MAJOR TOOL CRUSH, the Milwaukee M18 FUEL 18-Volt Lithium-Ion Brushless Cordless Hammer Drill & Impact Driver Combo Kit (2-Tool) w/(2) 5Ah Batteries.

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This kit, though a big initial investment is a fantastic value. I paid a little less for my (other brand) 18V drill/driver kit a few years ago and they served me well, but now having used several of Milwaukee’s tools on their 12v and 18v battery platforms, I’m making the switch to Milwaukee everywhere it makes sense. Their battery-powered grinders are nice, the flood/spot light comes in extremely handy, and the random orbital sander has earned its spot in my traveling farm tools bag. I’ve been slinging these tools around the farm, in the shop, and around the tiny house build for the past six months and I love them.

“There is a $179 version of this kit on sale this weekend at Home Depot. What makes these different? As a weekend warrior, do I need the more expensive kit?”

The biggest difference is that the drill motors in these cheaper options are not brushless. As I was trying to find the right words on how to explain the difference between brushless and standard drill motors, I found this awesome article in Popular Mechanics that explains it way better than I could. Will the weekend warrior ever be able to tell the difference between a brushless and non brushless motor? That is debatable, but the real difference between the two kits, at least for me, is the 5ah batteries that come in the more expensive kit. I was a little worried that the 5ah batteries would make the tools a tad too heavy, but that hasn’t been the case. The battery life is great and the weight is surprisingly low considering the power and amp hours available.

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 As I tend to do, I’ve used the drill and driver for a few unconventional applications, and they performed exceedingly well. I got a lot of flack for using the ½” driver with a paddle to mix my drywall mud for the tiny house, but it worked like a charm, and since I didn’t have power cords at the build site this time around, it genuinely was the only option available. The hammer drill has loosened quite a few rusty nuts around the farm (I’m still curious as to why the previous farm owner used assorted sized nuts and bolts SO frequently in the place of regular screws and nails). It’s drilled quite a few holes because it was the handiest option and I happened to have square drive drill bits.

 I used the drill and driver quite a bit in my shavehorse build, installing the subfloor, drywall, steel roofing and concrete board in the tiny house, as I was shoring up the roof of the metal shop, and on the chicken coop build, and I’ve found zero complaints thus far.

Awesome Features on the Hammer Drill:

·      Light and compact- allows for access to tight spaces while still delivering surprising power

·      ½” chuck expands the applications of the tool significantly

·      Variable speed trigger

·      2 speed gearbox, 1200 lbs of torque

Awesome Features on the Impact Driver:

·      Single handed bit insert on the ¼” hex chuck

·      Self-tapping screw function for metal roofing screws

These tools retail for $379. Would I buy them?

Absolutely. It is definitely an investment, but a valid one, especially if you’re already on the Milwaukee battery platform. If you’re not, I’d strongly encourage you to look at the brushless options within your current battery platform before making the investment. The Ridgid and Makita brushless drill/driver kits are also really great options.

 





Posted on October 2, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.